Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Oh Woe Is Me, Them Terrible Greens


Yesterday was a beautiful day at Flowerfield. I worked in oils, using my primary palette on canvas board that was primed with gesso and texture paste, I digress. The second painting was done on location and worked on at home, just couldn't pull it together. It's headed for the closet. The second was done in 45 minutes, a quickie.

Greens, not using the color green, but mixing various shades and tones of greens with the primary colors. It aint easy! All in all it's just part of the process, and I love a challenge. Happy Painting everyone

13 comments:

  1. The one to the right is just right...it looks good both at first glance and the closer look, Joan. Vry nice feel to it and a good job with those greens.
    Do you pre mix you values and chroma of green? I think that helps very much in the execution of a plein air.

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  2. The second painting is perfect, Joan and the first one can dry and then have some detail added to it. The greens are very delicate and true!

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  3. Hi Joan.
    These are really lovely paintings ( Good old Oils eh? ). I love your colour scheme my friend. I can never make up my mind what colours to use. Great paintings Joan. All the best.
    Vic.

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  4. Hi there Joan!... Good to see "You" out there ... bravely battling the summer greens!

    Artist friends I have known for decades use this period of transition... "the greening"... as an excuse for their own laziness to work with green - mixing and understanding "how it works" in the field. It is frustrating... but really does produce great growth in "managing" colour for the plein air painter!

    You have the right idea Joan! Paint your way through it... again and again... experimenting... forgetting about the "masterpiece"... sending many to the closet... without concern or worry!

    Placing contrasting subjects into the greenery is the key in my findings Joan. A building... a tree... and yes... even a swan or two... can give the green backdrop balance and new meaning. Be a bit braver in stating this difference... but don't make it too "blaring".... a harmonious coexistence!

    Treating the greens as masses rather than blurs can produce pleasingly.... almost geometric blocks that fit together to make a nice , loose painting! Just some ideas to think about!

    Good Painting!

    Warmest regards,
    Bruce

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  5. I had forgotten how hard it is with oils and especially the greens. You did a fantastic job here. Your talent show through in whatever medium you chose.

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  6. Nice variation in your greens!! That is such a nice place to paint. It was good to see you.

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  7. Hi Cathyann,

    Thank you for the helpful tip. I worked from the 3 primary colors and mixed on my palette as I painted. It was just a bad day, great location but couldn't pull together. Thank you for your support.
    All the best to you,
    Joan

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  8. Hi Marie,

    Thank you for the visit and encouraging words. I will take that advice that is much appreciated and will go back to add more detail.

    All the best to you,
    Joan

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  9. Hi Vic,

    Thank you my friend. We are both in the same boat about what colors to use. I'll be looking forward to your next post.

    All the best to you,
    Joan

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  10. Dear Bruce,

    Your comment and wonderful tips are priceless. Your encouragement and visits to my blog are soooo very appreciated. Thank you.

    All the best to you,
    Joan

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  11. Hi Dors,

    You are so very kind. Your comments are truly encouraging to me. I will be over to visit your blog. That handsome boy is looking great.

    all the best to you,
    Joan

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  12. Hi Joan,

    Thank you so much. I will see you tomorrow.

    All the best to you,
    Joan

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  13. Green can be a bear. I so agree. Like you, I, too, use a bare bones primary palette. It makes a variety of greens a challenge. But like Bruce, I look for the chance to use another color in my summer landscapes.

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